Halal Travel Expected to Shoot up to US$300B by 2026

Millennials are shaking up the travel industry with their penchant for authentic, unique experiences and Muslims are no exception to this rule. The size of the Halal travel industry is expected to skyrocket with more millennials entering the workforce and pocketing greater disposable incomes.

That’s one of the key takeaways of “Halal Travel Frontier 2018”, an industry report published by Crescent Rating in conjunction with MasterCard.

Crescent Rating, which first started analyzing the Muslim travel market in 2008, says that there were an estimated 126 million Muslim travelers in 2016. The number is expected to grow by nearly 30% in the next four years, settling on 156 million travelers in 2020.

In 2015, Crescent Rating estimated total purchases by Muslim travelers to be roughly US$145 billion. This factors in expenditure on Halal food, hotels, excursions & experiences, and shopping. The number is expected to rise to a colossal US$300 billion by 2026 – more than doubling in volume in a little over a decade.

A large chunk of this growth is fueled by millennial Muslim travelers in the fast-growing economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, Turkey, and Gulf countries. 60% of the population in Muslim majority countries is currently under the age of 30 – a stark contrast to the global average, which is 11%.

It’s a demographic that players in the travel & tourism space simply cannot afford to ignore anymore.

“Brands would also need to increase their level of empathy and find new ways to better connect with Muslim travelers,” explains Fazal Behardeen, CEO of Crescent Rating. “This will be key in order to both appeal and empower their Muslim travelers.”

What are Muslim millennials looking for?

One of the seminal insights proffered by Crescent Rating is the emergence of the Muslim female travel segment. This particular demographic is gradually becoming a force in its own right with females opting to travel with their friends & family in small to medium-sized groups.

The key purchasing factors for such consumers are “specialized travel products and lifestyle services.” Destinations looking to attract female Muslim travelers are advised to engender a safe and accessible environment that respects the cultural and religious sensitivities at play.

South Africa and Indonesia are tipped to be major travel destinations for Muslims, but Asia as a whole is expected to eat up the largest chunk. The Indonesian government itself has set up an ambitious target of attracting 5 million Halal travelers in 2019, more than double the 2 million that visited in 2016. Other popular destinations are Malaysia, Thailand, and Singapore.

Sporting events in Asia such as the Winter Olympics in South Korea this year as well as the Tokyo Summer Olympics in 2020 are also expected to court significant numbers of travelers from Muslim-majority countries.

Outbound travel markets. Photo credit: Crescent Rating

The potential is undeniable. How can brands cash in?

Muslim travelers tend to weigh in specific factors before reaching a firm decision on a travel destination, according to Crescent Rating. There should be facilities that allow for accessible prayer areas, restaurants & cafes serving certified Halal food, and toilets with provision for ablution. Most travelers will flock to social media or do extensive research on the web prior to embarking on their journey.

At the same time, governments also have an opportunity to help local businesses by offering prayer facilities and Halal food in public locations like airports, railway stations, and places of interest. Taiwan is cited as an example of a country actively working to meet this demand.

Like millennials around the world, Muslim travelers will likely start their buyer’s journey on the web by searching for travel content but most mainstream sites – Booking.com and Agoda, for example – don’t have dedicated listings for Halal-friendly establishments or significant insights on where Muslims might feel comfortable.

“We find that Muslim millennial travelers are like most millennial travelers apart from their uncompromising faith-based needs,” explains Raudha Zaini, marketing manager at Halal Trip, a B2C travel portal for Muslims. “They seek what we call the 3As when they travel – Authentic Experience, Affordable Facilities and Accessible Network – all within the radius of their faith requirements.”

According to the Pew Research Center, the Muslim demographic around the world is expected to grow twice as fast as the overall world population between 2015 to 2060, reaching a projected 3 billion individuals. In terms of consumer spending alone, the global Islamic economy generated US$1.9 trillion in food and lifestyle expenditure in 2015 with projections that it’ll grow significantly to US$3 trillion by 2021.

For brands looking to appeal to a gargantuan demographic hiding in plain sight, they’ll have to focus on crafting their message and developing empathy. That’s key if they’re looking to connect with young Muslims on a personal level. One thing for sure is that the market will continue to expand at a ferocious rate.

So far the rate of adoption has been slow, at best. UK-based retailer Marks & Spencer launched a burkini swimwear collection in 2016 to a spurt of criticism. Despite dissenting voices, the line completely sold out showing there’s real demand.

Other examples are the 2017 launch of the four-star Al-Meroz hotel in Bangkok, the first Halal hotel in Thailand as well as Expedia’s US$350 million in Indonesian online travel platform Traveloka the same year.

But these are tepid responses to a market valued at hundreds of billions. Larger brands can, and should step up to match smaller incumbents like Indonesian halal cosmetics company Wardah, India’s IbaHalalCare, and California-based AmaraCosmetics.

Originally published on EIQ

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